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  1. Medicare reimbursement for hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    hyperbaric oxygen therapyBy Carrie Carls, BSN, RN, CWOCN, CHRN, and Sherry Clayton, RHIA In an atmosphere of changing reimbursement, it’s important to understand indications and utilization guidelines for healthcare services. Otherwise, facilities won’t receive appropriate reimbursement for provided services. This article focuses… Read more…

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  2. How do you prove a wound was unavoidable?

    unavoidable pressure ulcersBy Jeri Lundgren, BSN, RN, PHN, CWS, CWCN A pressure ulcer that a patient acquires in your facility or a patient’s existing pressure ulcer that worsens puts your organization at risk for regulatory citations as well as litigation. Unless you… Read more…

    Comments: 2 Comments

  3. Successful documentation of wound care

    By Cheryl Ericson, MS, RN, CCDS, CDIP Providers are often surprised at how pages upon pages of documentation in a patient’s health record can result in few reportable diagnosis and/or procedure codes, which often fail to capture the complexity of… Read more…

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  4. Making professional connections

    Making professional connectionsBy Kathleen D. Pagana, PhD, RN Are you making connections that benefit your career? Are you comfortable starting a conversation at a networking session? Do you know how to exit a conversation gracefully when it’s time to move on? These… Read more…

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  5. How to set up an effective wound care formulary and guideline

    wound care formulary and guidelineBy Jeri Lundgren, BSN, RN, PHN, CWS, CWCN Navigating through the thousands of wound care products can be overwhelming and confusing. I suspect that if you checked your supply rooms and treatment carts today, you would find stacks of unused… Read more…

    Comments: 1 Comment

  6. Immobility as the root cause of pressure ulcers

    By Jeri Lundgren, BSN, RN, PHN, CWS, CWCN Many factors can contribute to the formation of a pressure ulcer, but it’s rare that one develops in an active, mobile patient. As the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel 2014 guidelines state,… Read more…

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  7. Motivational interviewing: A collaborative path to change

    By Sharon Morrison, MAT, RN Michael had diabetes and a history of elevated blood glucose levels. A long-time drinker, he seemed to have no interest in giving up the habit. I met him while working as a diabetes nurse educator… Read more…

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  8. I’m going to conference!

    By: Donna Sardina, RN, MHA, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS Years ago, when I first started out in the wound care specialty, the only way to learn about new products and what was going on in the field was to “go… Read more…

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  9. Healthcare reform and changes provide opportunities for wound care clinicians

    By Kathleen D. Schaum, MS Qualified healthcare professionals (QHPs), such as physicians, podiatrists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurse specialists, are taught to diagnose the reasons that chronic wounds aren’t healing and to create plans of care for aggressively managing… Read more…

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  10. Helping Sandwich Generation nurses find a work-life balance

    By Kari Olson Finnegan, BSN, and Liz Ferron, MSW, LICSW If you have at least one parent age 65 or older and are raising children or financially supporting a child age 18 or older, you’re part of the Sandwich Generation.… Read more…

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  11. Creating effective education programs on a shoestring budget

    By Jennifer Oakley, BS, RN, WCC, DWC, OMS It’s time again for annual staff education, and you, the certified wound clinician, need to teach the staff at your organization. You dream of staff entering a state-of-the-art classroom with computers at… Read more…

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  12. Confronting conflict with higher-ups

    By Pam Bowers, RN, and Liz Ferron, MSW, LICSW Conflict in the workplace is a fact of life, and dealing with it is never easy. Sometimes it seems easier to ignore it and hope it will take care of itself.… Read more…

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  13. How to love and care for yourself unconditionally

    By Yolanda G. Smith, MSN, RN, CCRN Are you able to relax, have fun, and enjoy the simple pleasures of life? Or do you: have trouble falling or staying asleep? smoke, drink, or eat to reduce tension? have headaches, back… Read more…

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  14. Eating better to help manage chronic stress

    By Debra Rose Wilson, PhD, MSN, RN, IBCLC, AHN-BC, and Dana Marie Dillard, MS, HSMI Like many clinicians, you may experience stress frequently, both on and off the job. Chronic stress can alter your equilibrium (homeostasis), activating physiologic reactive pathways… Read more…

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  15. Protecting yourself from a job layoff

    by Donna Sardina, RN, MHA, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS With uncertainty over how the Affordable Care Act (ACA) ultimately will affect operations, hospitals and other healthcare facilities are tightening up. In many areas, they’re laying off staff. In May, the… Read more…

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  16. Wise use of antibiotics in patients with wound infections

    Antibiotic resistance is a pressing public health threat not only in the United States, but worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), it is one of the major threats to human health. Despite these concerns, antibiotics continue to be widely used—and overused. In long-term care,… Read more…

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  17. 10 tips for a successful professional conference

    Attending a professional conference can yield many benefits if you follow these 10 tips. 1 Obtain new knowledge. Conferences provide opportunities for clinicians to gain new knowledge about procedures, technology, and research. Take notes and keep handouts for reference. After you return, share what you have learned with… Read more…

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  18. Comprehensive turning programs can avoid a pain in the back

    Turning programs are essential to prevent and promote healing of pressure ulcers and to prevent the many negative effects of immobility, ranging from constipation to respiratory infections. However, turning a patient often puts a caregiver’s body in an awkward position,… Read more…

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  19. Becoming a wound care diplomat

    By Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, CWS, DWC, and Denise Stetter, PT, WCC, DCCT The Rolling Stones may have said it best when they sang, “You can’t always get what you want,” a sentiment that also applies to wound care. A… Read more…

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  20. Achieving a work-life balance

    Nurse Work Life BalanceBy Julie Boertje, MS, RN, LMFT, QMRP, and Liz Ferron, MSW, LICSW Almost everyone agrees that achieving a work-life balance is a good thing. Without it, we risk long-term negative effects on our physical and mental health, our relationships, and… Read more…

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  21. What to do when someone pushes your buttons

    By Laura L. Barry, MBA, MMsc, and Maureen Sirois, MSN, RN, CEN, ANP Why is it that some things don’t bother us, while other things catapult us from an emotional 0 to 60 mph in a heartbeat? We all know… Read more…

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  22. Make your patient-teaching idea a patented reality

    By Joy Hooper, BSN, RN, CWOCN, OMS Have you ever had an idea for improving patient care that you wanted to market? You may have lacked confidence or know-how, as I once did. But one patient, a crafty idea, and… Read more…

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  23. Balancing the wheels of life

    Have you ever ridden a bicycle with a wobbly wheel? The ride isn’t smooth, and you notice every bump in the road. As you focus on your discomfort, you may be distracted from the beautiful vistas you’re riding past. Think of the bicycle as your… Read more…

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  24. Creating high-performance interprofessional teams

    By Terry Eggenberger, PhD, RN, CNE, CNL; Rose O. Sherman, EdD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN; and Kathryn Keller, PhD, RN Kate Summer, a wound care clinician in a urban hospital, is leading an initiative to reduce pressure ulcers. She knows from… Read more…

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  25. Understanding NPUAP’s updates to pressure ulcer terminology and staging

    On April 13, 2016, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) announced changes in pressure ulcer terminology and staging definitions. Providers can adapt NPUAP’s changes for their clinical practice and documentation, but it’s important to note that, as of press time, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid… Read more…

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  26. Practicing emotional intelligence may help reduce lateral violence

    It’s been a stressful day at work—nothing new. One confused patient pulled off her ostomy bag, you’re having difficulties applying negative-pressure wound therapy on another, and a third patient’s family is angry with you. We all experience stressful days, but unfortunately, sometimes we take our stress… Read more…

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  27. How to fit in fast at your new job

    By Gregory S. Kopp, RN, MN, MHA A new job can be stimulating, but it can also be stressful. Not only will you have new responsibilities, but you’ll also have a new setting, new leaders, and new colleagues. And the… Read more…

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  28. Restorative nursing programs help prevent pressure ulcers

    Immobility affects all our body systems, including our skin. According to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, many contributing factors are associated with the formation of a pressure ulcer, with impaired mobility leading the list. So what can clinicians do… Read more…

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  29. Dealing with difficult people

    By Rose O. Sherman, EdD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN Unfortunately, most clinicians can't avoid having to work with difficult people. However we can learn how to be more effective in these situations, keeping in mind that learning to work with difficult… Read more…

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  30. Top 10 outpatient reimbursement questions

      At the 2015 Wild on Wounds conference, the interactive workshop “Are You Ready for an Outpatient Reimbursement Challenge?” featured a lively discussion among participants about 25 real-life reimbursement scenarios. Here are the top 10 questions the attendees asked, with… Read more…

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  31. The power of the positive

    Being positive in a negative situation is not naïve. It’s leadership. — Ralph S. Marston, Jr., author and publisher of The Daily Motivator website Clinicians may encounter many challenges and stressors in the workplace—long hours, rotating shifts, inadequate staffing, poor… Read more…

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  32. Have you made your New Year’s resolutions?

    Aresolution is a serious decision or determination to do, or not to do, something. Traditionally, most New Year’s resolutions focus on self-improvement: losing weight, giving up a bad habit, exercising more, being a better person. Because most of us spend about… Read more…

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  33. Avoid surprises when connecting between care settings

    By Jeri Lundgren, BSN, RN, PHN, CWS, CWCN As wound care clinicians, we know that an interdisciplinary, holistic approach to prevention and management of a wound is crucial to positive outcomes, no matter where the patient is being seen. Yet… Read more…

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  34. Mastering the art of meetings

    By Toni Ann Loftus, MBA, RN, MHA Meetings are a powerful communication tool. They bring together people who can look at an issue from their own unique perspective and contribute to a solution acceptable to many disciplines. Generally, meetings are… Read more…

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  35. Role of rehab in wound care

     By Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC, and Denise Richlen, PT, WCC, DCCT How many times have you heard someone say, “I didn’t know PTs did wound care”? Statements like this aren’t uncommon. The role of physical therapists (PTs), occupational therapists,… Read more…

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