Tag Archives: Electrical stimulation

How to benefit from electrical stimulation for the treatment of chronic wounds

One of the most amazing things about the human body is its ability to repair itself. Lacerations, punctures, abrasions all heal with little or no care. Chronic wounds, those that persist day after day, are a small subset of wounds but they compose a troublesome minority. They include, but are not limited to, diabetic foot ulcers (DFU), venous leg ulcers (VLU), and pressure ulcers (colloquially known as bedsores). These represent the body’s failure to fix itself.

Approximately 6.5 million Americans are affected by chronic wounds. Because of certain medical trends (aging populations, increased occurrence of diabetes, the rise in obesity), chronic wounds are becoming more common, occurrences increasing at around 8% per year. The US spends $25 billion annually treating these wounds, which are the most expensive complication following surgery. Wounds are a major source of bacteria that drive infection rates at hospitals.

Initial treatment of a chronic wound involves regular cleaning and covering the damaged area with wound dressings and bandages. In many instances, the physician will debride the dead or inflamed tissue, removing it by various methods ranging from plucking it away with tweezers to introducing maggots to the wound where they consume the damaged tissues.

However, some wounds still fail to heal. These ulcers require advanced therapies. These include:

  • Electrical stimulation
  • Negative pressure
  • Hyperbaric oxygen
  • Growth factors
  • Skin substitutes
  • Stem cells

Nursing home healthcare professionals will select the specific treatment best suited for their patients. A new treatment option using electrical stimulation, the Bioelectrical Signal Therapy (BST) Device from E-QURE may soon present a very cost and time-effective solution.

Read more of the article at McKnight’s

Clinical Notes, September 2016

Electrical stimulation and pressure ulcer healing in SCI patients

A systematic review of eight clinical trials of 517 patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and at least one pressure ulcer indicates that electrical stimulation increases the healing rate of pressure ulcers. Wounds with electrodes overlaying the wound bed seem to have faster pressureulcer healing than wounds with electrodes placed on intact skin around the ulcer.

A quantitative, pooled analysis and systematic review of controlled trials on the impact of electrical stimulation settings and placement on pressure ulcer healing rates in persons with spinal cord injuries,” published in Ostomy Wound Managementstates that the overall quality of the studies was “moderate” and that future trials “are warranted.”

Effect of antiseptics on maggot viability

The short-term application of wound antiseptics on wound beds does not impair the viability of maggots, according to a study in International Wound Journal.

Viability of Lucilia sericata maggots after exposure to wound antiseptics” reports that the maggots can survive up to 1 hour of exposure to antiseptics, such as octenidine, povidone-iodine, or polyhexanide.

Global impact of diabetes underestimated

The prevalence of global diabetes has been seriously underestimated by at least 25%, according to a study published in Nature Reviews Endocrinology.

Diabetes mellitus statistics on prevalence and mortality: facts and fallacies” indicates that there may be more than 100 million people with diabetes globally than previously thought.

Axillary evaluation and lymphedema

A retrospective cohort study in Epidemiology reports that women with ductal carcinoma in situ who receive an axillary evaluation have higher rates of lymphedema, without breast cancer-specific or overall survival benefit.

Axillary evaluation and lymphedema in women with ductal carcinoma in situ” included 10,504 women.

Topical insulin and pressure ulcers

A randomized, controlled trial to assess the effect of topical insulin versus normal saline in pressure ulcer healing” concludes that topical insulin is safe and effective in reducing the size of pressure ulcers compared to normal saline-soaked gauze.

Participants of the study, published in Ostomy Wound Management, received either normal saline dressing gauze or insulin dressing twice daily for 7 days. The insulin was sprayed over the wound surface with an insulin syringe, allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and then covered with sterile gauze.

Sexual function and ostomy

Sexual function and health-related quality of life in long-term rectal cancer survivors” reports that long-term sexual dysfunction is common in patients who have undergone surgery for rectal cancer, with more problems seen in patients who have a permanent ostomy.

The study, published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, included 181 patients with an ostomy and 394 patients with anastomosis.

Effect of venous leg ulcers on body image

Many patients with venous leg ulcers have low self-esteem and negative feelings about their bodies, according to a prospective study published in Advances in Skin & Wound Care.

The impact of venous leg ulcers on body image and self-esteem” included 59 participants. The mean score on the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale was 22.66, indicating low self-esteem.