You Are Here

Skin Damage Associated with Moisture and Pressure

American Nurse Today webinars

Skin damage associated with moisture and pressure

Program Objectives

  • Identify how wounds are classified according to wound depth and etiology.
  • Describe the etiology of a pressure injury (PI) and incontinence-associated skin damage (IAD).
  • Discuss evidence-based protocols of care of prevention and management if IAD and PIs.
  • Describe the NPUAP-EPUAP Pressure Injury Classification System.
  • Identify appropriate products that can be used for preventioin and treatment of IAD and PIs.

Our Speakers

Linda Moore, BSN, RN, CWON
Featured Speaker | Linda Moore BSN, RN, CWON Clinical Resource Specialist ConvaTec
Cynthia Saver, MS, RN
Moderator | Cynthia Saver MS, RN

 

Submit below to view the Webinar and download Slidedeck

*By downloading this (product) you are opting in to receiving information from Healthcom Media and Affiliates. Or the details, including your email address/mobile number, may be used to keep you informed about future products and services.
Read More

Winning the battle of skin tears in an aging population

ON DEMAND webinar

Winning the battle of skin tears in an aging population

This April 25th, 2017 webinar overviews a significant challenge that healthcare providers encounter daily.

“Skin tears” may sound like a relatively minor event, but in reality, these injuries can have a significant impact on the quality of patients’ lives in the form of pain, infection, and limited mobility. The incidence of skin tears has been reported to be as high as 1.5 million annually, and with an aging population, this number is likely to go higher. In this webinar, experts will explain how nurses can use an evidence-based approach—including following practice guidelines to assess the wound and select the proper dressing—for managing skin tears and minimizing their negative effects.

 

Our Speakers

The skin tear challenge

Kimberly LeBlanc, MN, RN, CETN(C) Advanced practice nurse

Kimberly LeBlanc
MN, RN, CETN(C)
Advanced practice nurse, KDS Professional Consulting President, International Skin Tear Advisory Panel
An expert in skin tears, Kimberly will briefly set the stage by addressing the seriousness of skin tears and briefly addressing assessment such as classification.

The main focus will be on management, including goals of care, wound cleaning, wound bed preparation, and dressing selection.

Content will include information from the 2016 consensus statement on skin tears published in Advances in Skin & Wound Care.

|

Tips and techniques for managing dressings for skin tears

Shannon Cyphers, RN, BSN, WCC Clinical Account Manager ConvaTec, Inc.

Shannon Cyphers
RN, BSN, WCC

Clinical Account Manager, ConvaTec, Inc.
Shannon will present wound and skin care product applications to help manage skin tears.

|

Submit below to view the Webinar and download Slidedeck

Questions or comments?  Please contact sgoller@healthcommedia.com

*By downloading this (product) you are opting in to receiving information from Healthcom Media and Affiliates. Or the details, including your email address/mobile number, may be used to keep you informed about future products and services.
Read More

Skin Damage Associated with Moisture and Pressure ebook

Convatec Skin Damage ebook

> Fill out this form to receive your free ebook

|sponsored by Convatec|

 

by downloading this ebook you are opting in to receiving information from Convatec.

Read More

Better Skin Grafts – take only one layer

skin graft take one layer

Research shows that a skin-graft harvesting system aids chronic wound recovery and reduces care costs by accelerating the healing process.

More than six million cases of chronic wounds cost $20 billion each year in the United States. Diabetic ulcers, pressure sores, surgical site wounds, and traumatic injuries to high-risk patients account for most wounds that won’t heal. (more…)

Read More

New Approach to Wound Healing Easy on Skin, Tough on Bacteria

wound healing

Washington, D.C. — In a presentation  to the American Chemical Society meeting, Ankit Agarwal, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, described an experimental approach to wound healing that could take advantage of silver’s anti-bacterial properties, while sidestepping the damage silver can cause to cells needed for healing.

Silver is widely used to prevent bacterial contamination in wound dressings, says Agarwal, “but these dressings deliver a very large load of silver, and that can kill a lot of cells in the wound.” (more…)

Read More

Fish Skin for Human Wounds: Iceland’s Pioneering Treatment

Fish Skin for Human Wounds

The FDA-approved skin substitute reduces inflammation and transforms chronic wounds into acute injuries.

Six hours north of Reykjavik, along a narrow road tracing windswept fjords, is the Icelandic town of Isafjordur, home of 3,000 people and the midnight sun. On a blustery May afternoon, snow still fills the couloirs that loom over the docks, where the Pall Palsson, a 583-ton trawler, has just returned from a three-day trip. Below the rust-spotted deck, neat boxes are packed with freshly caught fish and ice. “If you take all the skins from that trawler,” says Fertram Sigurjonsson, the chairman and chief executive officer of Kerecis Ltd., gesturing over the catch, “we would be able to treat one in five wounds in the world.” (more…)

Read More

Severe Burn Victims May Soon Be Able to Regrow Hair-Bearing Skin

Regenerates Full-Thickness Hair-Bearing Skin in Burns and Wounds

PolarityTE (TM) Regenerates Full-Thickness Hair-Bearing Skin in Burns and Wounds Using Their Revolutionary Platform Technology. First ever known successful regeneration of full-thickness skin and hair; Company poised to initiate human trial in the third quarter of 2017; Management to host conference call Thursday, June 8th at 4:30pm ET.

Salt Lake City, UT — (Marketwired) — 06/08/17 — PolarityTE™, Inc. (NASDAQ: COOL) today announced pre-clinical results demonstrating that the Company’s lead product, SkinTE™, regenerated full-thickness, organized skin and hair follicles in third degree burn wounds. The findings represent the first known successful regeneration of skin and hair in full-thickness swine wound models, the standard animal model for human skin. The Company expects to initiate a human clinical trial evaluating the autologous homologous SkinTE™ construct in the third quarter of 2017. (more…)

Read More

Skin Care & Treatment

Skin Care & Treatment

  1. Wound exudate types

    Wound Exudate TypesBY: NANCY MORGAN, RN, BSN, MBA, WOCN, WCC, CWCMS, DWC What exactly is wound exudate? Also known as drainage, exudate is a liquid produced by the body in response to tissue damage. We want our patients’ wounds to be moist,… Read more…

    Comments: 36 Comments

  2. Understanding stoma complications

    By Rosalyn S. Jordan, RN, BSN, MSc, CWOCN, WCC, OMS; and Judith LaDonna Burns, LPN, WCC, DFC About 1 million people in the United States have either temporary or permanent stomas. A stoma is created surgically to divert fecal material… Read more…

    Comments: 12 Comments

  3. How dietary protein intake promotes wound healing

    dietary protein intake promotes wound healingBy Nancy Collins, PhD, RD, LD/N, FAPWCA, and Allison Schnitzer Nutrition is a critical factor in the wound healing process, with adequate protein intake essential to the successful healing of a wound. Patients with both chronic and acute wounds, such… Read more…

    Comments: 11 Comments

  4. Guidelines for safe negative-pressure wound therapy

    safe negative-pressure wound therapyBy Ron Rock MSN, RN, ACNS-BC Since its introduction almost 20 years ago, negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become a leading technology in the care and management of acute, chronic, dehisced, traumatic wounds; pressure ulcers; diabetic ulcers; orthopedic trauma; skin… Read more…

    Comments: 7 Comments

  5. Using maggots in wound care: Part 1

    maggots in wound careBy: Ronald A. Sherman, MD; Sharon Mendez, RN, CWS; and Catherine McMillan, BA Maggot therapy is the controlled, therapeutic application of maggots to a wound. Simple to use, it provides rapid, precise, safe, and powerful debridement. Many wound care professionals… Read more…

    Comments: 4 Comments

  6. When and how to culture a chronic wound

    how to culture a chronic woundBy Marcia Spear, DNP, ACNP-BC, CWS, CPSN Chronic wound infections are a significant healthcare burden, contributing to increased morbidity and mortality, prolonged hospitalization, limb loss, and higher medical costs. What’s more, they pose a potential sepsis risk for patients. For… Read more…

    Comments: 2 Comments

  7. Lymphedema 101 – Part 2: Treatment

    By Steve Norton, CDT, CLT-LANA Editor’s note: Part 1 of this series, published in the September-October issue, discussed lymphedema pathology and diagnosis. This article, Part 2, covers treatment. Traditional treatment approaches Traditionally, lymphedema treatment has been approached without a clear… Read more…

    Comments: 1 Comment

  8. Using maggots in wound care: Part 2

    Maggots Wound CareBy Ronald A. Sherman, MD; Sharon Mendez, RN, CWS; and Catherine McMillan, BA Note From the Editor: This is the second of two articles on maggot therapy. The first article appeared in our July/August 2014 issue, Read part 1 here.… Read more…

    Comments: 1 Comment

  9. Clinician Resources

    Wound patient’s bill of rights The Association for Advancement of Wound Care has developed the “Wound Care Patient’s Bill of Rights.” The 10 points include the right to: • know what wound treatment options are available to you • know the benefits, risks, and… Read more…

    Comments: 1 Comment

  10. Collagen Target May Lead To Treatment Of Wounds, Wrinkles and Fragile Skin

    http://medicalresearch.com/author-interviews/collagen-target-wounds-wrinkles-fragile-skin/10343/

    Comments: Leave a comment

  11. Discovery Promises Unique Medicine for Treatment of Chronic and Diabetic Wounds

    Click here to read this article.

    Comments: Leave a comment

  12. Clinical Notes: Moldable Skin Barrier, hypoglycemia, diabetic food ulcers

    Moldable skin barrier effective for elderly patients with ostomy A study in Gastroenterology Nursing reports that compared to a conventional skin barrier, a moldable skin barrier significantly improves self-care satisfaction scores in elderly patients who have a stoma. The moldable skin barrier also caused less irritant dermatitis… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  13. Herpes zoster: Understanding the disease, its treatment, and prevention

    Herpes zoster: Understanding the disease, its treatment, and preventionHerpes zoster (HZ, also called shingles) is a painful condition that produces a maculopapular and vesicular rash. Usually, the rash appears along a single dermatome (band) around one side of the body or face. In most cases, pain, tingling, burning,… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  14. Clinician Resources: human trafficking, npuap, caregiver, ostomy, HIV

    Check out the following resources, all designed to help you in your clinical practice. Human trafficking resources Victims of human trafficking often suffer tremendous physical and psychological damage. Clinicians play an important role in identifying potential victims so they can obtain help. Here are some… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  15. Frequently asked questions about support surfaces

    The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) describes support surfaces as “specialized devices for pressure redistribution designed for management of tissue loads, microclimate, and/or other therapeutic functions.” These devices include specialized mattresses, mattress overlays, chair cushions, and pads used on… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  16. Causes, prevention, and treatment of epibole

    As full-thickness wounds heal, they begin to fill in from the bottom upward with granulation tissue. At the same time, wound edges contract and pull together, with movement of epithelial tissue toward the center of the wound (contraction). These epithelial cells, arising from either the wound margins or… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  17. Skin substitutes: Understanding product differences

    Skin substitutes (also called tissuebased products and dermal replacements) are a boon to chronic wound management when traditional therapies have failed. When selecting skin substitutes for their formularies, wound care professionals have many product options—and many decisions to make. Repair… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  18. Clinician Resources: Patient Safety, Ostomy, Wound Management

    This issue’s resources include patient tools and new guidelines. Improving patient safety Research suggests that adverse events affect patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) more frequently, are commonly caused by communication problems, and are more likely to result in serious… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  19. Wise use of antibiotics in patients with wound infections

    Antibiotic resistance is a pressing public health threat not only in the United States, but worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), it is one of the major threats to human health. Despite these concerns, antibiotics continue to be widely used—and overused. In long-term care,… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  20. Clinical Notes: ostomy, pressure ulcer, burn treatment

    Self-management ostomy program improves HRQOL A five-session ostomy self-care program with a curriculum based on the Chronic Care Model can improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL), according to a study in Psycho-Oncology. “A chronic care ostomy self-management program for cancer survivors” describes results from a longitudinal pilot… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  21. Ask the treatment expert: Should treatment nurses be certified?

    Click here to read this article.

    Comments: Leave a comment

  22. No more skin tears

    Imagine watching your skin tear, bleed, and turn purple. Imagine, too, the pain and disfigurement you’d feel. What if you had to live through this experience repeatedly? That’s what many elderly people go through, suffering with skin tears through no fault of their own. Some go on… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  23. How to apply silver nitrate

    Topical application of silver nitrate is often used in wound care to help remove and debride hypergranulation tissue or calloused rolled edges in wounds or ulcerations. It’s also an effective agent to cauterize bleeding in wounds. Silver nitrate is a highly caustic material, so it must be… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  24. “This is how we’ve always done it” isn’t good enough

    Donna Sardina, RN, MHA, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS Have you ever faced responsibility for a patient-care situation you learned about in school but had yet to encounter in the real world? With so many different health conditions and constant advancements… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  25. Doing it cheaply vs. doing what’s best for patients

    Sad but true: Much of what we do as healthcare professionals is based on reimbursement. For nearly all the services and products we use in wound care and ostomy management, Medicare, Medicaid, and insurance companies control reimbursement. For many years, these payers have been deciding which interventions, medications,… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  26. Better Skin Grafts – take only one layer

    skin grafts take one layerResearch shows that a skin-graft harvesting system aids chronic wound recovery and reduces care costs by accelerating the healing process. More than six million cases of chronic wounds cost $20 billion each year in the United States. Diabetic ulcers, pressure sores,… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  27. Reduction of 50% in Diabetic Foot Ulcers With Stem Cells

    Diabetic Foot UlcersMUNICH — Local injection of mesenchymal stem cells derived from autologous bone marrow shows promise in healing recalcitrant neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers, a novel study from Egypt shows. Presenting the results at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD)… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  28. Clinician Resources: Intl Ostomy Assoc., Substance Use Disorder

    Take a few minutes to check out this potpourri of resources. International Ostomy Association The International Ostomy Association is an association of regional ostomy associations that is committed to improving the lives of ostomates. Resources on the association’s website include:… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  29. Management of Patients With Venous Leg Ulcers

    It is well documented that the prevalence of venous leg ulcers (VLUs) is increasing, coinciding with an ageing population. Accurate global prevalence of VLUs is difficult to estimate due to the range of methodologies used in studies and accuracy of… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  30. Clinical Notes: biofilm, bariatric surgery, statins and more

    Management of biofilm recommendations The Journal of Wound Care has published “Recommendations for the management of biofilm: a consensus document,” developed through the Italian Nursing Wound Healing Society. The panel that created the document identified 10 interventions strongly recommended for clinical practice; however, panel members noted that, “there… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  31. Providing evidence-based care for patients with lower-extremity cellulitis

    By Darlene Hanson, PhD, RN; Diane Langemo, PhD, RN, FAAN; Patricia Thompson, MS, RN; Julie Anderson, PhD, RN; and Keith Swanson, MD Cellulitis is an acute, painful, and potentially serious spreading bacterial skin infection that affects mainly the subcutaneous and… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  32. Instill instead: Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation for complex wounds

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) uses negative pressure to draw wound edges together, remove edema and infectious material, and promote perfusion and granulation tissue development. The tissue stretch and compression created by negative pressure during NPWT promotes tissue perfusion and granulation tissue development through angiogenesis, cellular proliferation, fibroblast migration, increased production… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  33. Ankle-brachial index: A dirty word?

    Donna Sardina, RN, MHA, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS Silence, roving eyes, fidgeting, excuses, a quick subject change—these are typical responses from healthcare clinicians when asked, “What’s the patient’s ankle-brachial index?” You’d think someone had just uttered a dirty word. The… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  34. From the Editor – Wound care superhero

    by Donna Sardina, RN, MHA, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS What an honor it is to be the wound care “superhero”—the guru, the healer, the go-to person. Unfortunately, this honor may be accompanied by wound care overload—too much to do in… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  35. One Doctor Exploring Wound Care on Earth and in Space

    In laboratories all across the globe, scientists are uncovering new and exciting breakthroughs in the realm of wound healing. For instance, a team out of Texas is blinding bacteria to prevent their spread. Meanwhile, a collective of doctors from the U.K. recently… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  36. Lymphedema and lipedema: What every wound care clinician should know

    Imagine you have a health condition that affects your life every day. Then imagine being told nothing can be done about it; you’ll just have to live with it. Or worse yet, your physician tells you the problem is “you’re just fat.” Many people with… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  37. Buzz Report: Latest trends, Part 1

    We all lead busy lives, with demanding work schedules and home responsibilities that can thwart our best intentions. Although we know it’s our responsibility to stay abreast of changes in our field, we may feel overwhelmed when we try to… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  38. Don’t go it alone

    A fundamental rule of wound care is to treat the “whole” patient, not just the “hole” in the patient. To do this, we need to focus on a holistic approach to healing, which means evaluating everything that’s going on with… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  39. Clincal Notes: Analysis, Osteomyelitis, sickle cell, maggot

    Value of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in wound care “Systematic reviews and meta-analyses—literature-based recommendations for evaluating strengths, weaknesses, and clinical value,” in Ostomy Wound Management, discusses evidence-based practice and how systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs) can help improve management… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  40. Restorative nursing programs help prevent pressure ulcers

    Immobility affects all our body systems, including our skin. According to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, many contributing factors are associated with the formation of a pressure ulcer, with impaired mobility leading the list. So what can clinicians do… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  41. Clinician Resources: Ulcer Prevention, CAUTI, Negative Bacteria

    Start the New Year off right by checking out these resources. Pressure ulcer prevention education Access the following education resources from Wounds International: The webinar “Real-world solutions for pressure ulcer prevention: Optimising the role of support surfaces” includes: • an… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  42. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    By Carrie Carls, BSN, RN, CWOCN, CHRN; Michael Molyneaux, MD; and William Ryan, CHT Every year, 1.9% of patients with diabetes develop foot ulcers. Of those, 15% to 20% undergo an amputation within 5 years of ulcer onset. During their… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  43. Clinician Resources: NPUAP, Pressure Ulcer Treatment, NIOSH

    The resources below will help you address issues in your practice. NPUAP position statement on hand check for bottoming out Use of the hand check to determine “bottoming out” of support systems should be limited to static air overlay mattresses,… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  44. NYU docs use machine learning

    Lymphedema causes unsightly swelling in the arms and legs. But researchers Mei Fu and Yao Wang have an idea for catching early symptoms sooner. Researchers at NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering have teamed up with those from the university’s Rory Meyers College of… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  45. Breaking silos: Effective wound healing means treatment across the continuum

    Around 6.5 million patients in the U.S. suffer from chronic wounds, such as pressure injuries or ulcers. Treatment costs $25 billion each year, representing a sizable and growing problem. Despite the wide impact of chronic wounds, it's rare to see specialized, effective… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  46. Long-Term Outcome of Pediatric Traumatic Wound Repair: Suture Versus Tissue Adhesive

    Summary This project is an observational trial investigating wound cosmetic appearance after repair of traumatic skin lacerations in the head area of pediatric patients with two different approaches to skin closure: sutures versus tissue adhesive. Photographs will be taken at two follow-up visits after repair… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

  47. New study compares DFU treatment healing rates

    Comments: Leave a comment

  48. Palliative wound care: Part 2

    This approach brings patient-centered care to life.  By Gail Rogers Hebert, MS, RN, CWCN, WCC, DWC, OMS, LNHA Editor’s note: This article is the second in a two-part series on palliative wound care. For the first part, click here. By… Read more…

    Comments: Leave a comment

Read More

Better Skin Grafts – take only one layer

skin grafts take one layer

Research shows that a skin-graft harvesting system aids chronic wound recovery and reduces care costs by accelerating the healing process.

More than six million cases of chronic wounds cost $20 billion each year in the United States. Diabetic ulcers, pressure sores, surgical site wounds, and traumatic injuries to high-risk patients account for most wounds that won’t heal. (more…)

Read More

Skin substitutes: Understanding product differences

Skin substitutes (also called tissuebased products and dermal replacements) are a boon to chronic wound management when traditional therapies have failed. When selecting skin substitutes for their formularies, wound care professionals have many product options—and many decisions to make.

Repair of skin defects has been a pressing concern for centuries. As early as the 15th century BC, Egyptian physicians chronicled procedures and herbal treatments to heal wounds, including xenografts (skin from another species). The practice of applying allografts (human cadaver skin) to wounds was first documented in 1503. In 1871, autologous skin grafting (skin harvested from the the person with the wound) was tried. Next came epithelial- cell seeding, which involves scraping off the superficial epithelium of healthy skin and transplanting the cells onto the wound. (more…)

Read More
1 2 3 22
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!

Wound Care is Important. Please spread the word :)

RSS5k
Follow by Email102k
Facebook4k
Facebook