Treatment

July/August 2016 Vol. 5 No. 4

Author: Ron Rock, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC

Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) uses negative pressure to draw wound edges together, remove edema and infectious material, and promote perfusion and granulation tissue development. The tissue stretch and compression created by negative pressure during NPWT promotes tissue perfusion and granulation tissue development through angiogenesis, cellular proliferation, fibroblast migration, increased . . .

Best of the Best 2016

Author: Nancy Morgan, RN, BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS

Topical application of silver nitrate is often used in wound care to help remove and debride hypergranulation tissue or calloused rolled edges in wounds or ulcerations. It’s also an effective agent to cauterize bleeding in wounds. Silver nitrate is a highly caustic material, so it must be used with . . .

Best of the Best 2016

Author: Gail R. Hebert, MS, RN CWCN, DWC, WCC, OMS

 
Imagine watching your skin tear, bleed, and turn purple. Imagine, too, the pain and disfigurement you’d feel.
What if you had to live through this experience repeatedly? That’s what many elderly people go through, suffering with skin tears through no fault of their own. Some go on . . .

March/April 2016 Vol. 5 No.2

Self-management ostomy program improves HRQOL
A five-session ostomy self-care program with a curriculum based on the Chronic Care Model can improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL), according to a study in Psycho-Oncology.
“A chronic care ostomy self-management program for cancer survivors” describes results from . . .

March/April 2016 Vol. 5 No.2

Author: Donna Sardina, RN, MHA, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS

Keeping clinicians up-to-date on clinical knowledge is one of the main goals of the Wild on Wounds (WOW) conference held each September in Las Vegas. Every year, I present the opening session, called “The Buzz Report,” which focuses on the latest-breaking wound care news—what’s new . . .

Best of the Best 2016

Author: Kristine Hoffman, DPM, FACFAS

Diabetic foot ulcers stem from multiple factors, including peripheral neuropathy, high plantar pressures, decreased vascularity, and impaired wound healing. Contributing significantly to morbidity, they may cause limb loss and death. (See Foot ulcers and diabetes.)

Initially, hydrocolloid dressings were developed to function as part of the stomal flange. Based on . . .

January/February 2016 Vol. 5 No. 1

Author: Nancy Morgan, RN, BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS

Each issue, Apple Bites brings you a tool you can apply in your daily practice. Here are examples of medications that can affect wound healing.

Assessment and care planning for wound healing should include a thorough review of the individual’s current medications to identify those that may affect healing . . .

Best of the Best 2016

By Donna Sardina, RN, MHA, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS
Having the proper support surface for beds and wheelchairs is imperative in preventing pressure ulcers. “Pressure” ulcers are named that for a reason—pressure is the primary cause of interruption of blood flow to the tissue. Unfortunately, guidelines for support surface . . .

Best of the Best 2016

By Nancy Morgan, RN, BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS
Each issue, Apple Bites brings you a tool you can apply in your daily practice. Here’s an overview of cutaneous candi­diasis.

Cutaneous candidiasis is an infection of the skin caused by the yeast Candida albicans or other Candida . . .

November/December 2015 Vol. 4 No. 6

Modified Braden risk score proposed
A study in Ostomy Wound Management states the risk classification of patients using Braden Scale scores should comprise three (rather than five) levels: high risk, with a total score ≤11; moderate risk, with a total score of 12 to 16; and mild risk, with a . . .