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Editorial Advisory Board

Editor-in-Chief

Donna Sardina, RN, MHA, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS
Co-Founder
Wound Care Education Institute
Lake Geneva, IL

Editorial Advisory Board

Nenette L. Brown, RN, PHN, MSN/FNP, WCC
Wound Care Program Coordinator
Sheriff’s Medical Services Division
San Diego, CA

Debra Clair, PhD, APN, RN, WOCN, WCC, DWC
Wound Care Provider
Alliance Community Hospital
Alliance, OH

Kulbir Dhillon, NP, WCC
Wound Care Specialist
Skilled Wound Care
Sacramento, CA

Fred Berg
Vice President, Marketing/Business Development
National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy
St. Joseph, MI

Cindy Broadus, RN, BSHA, LNHA, CLNC,
CLNI, CHCRM, WCC, DWC, OMS

Executive Director
National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy
St. Joseph, MI

Gail Hebert, MSN, RN, CWCN, WCC, DWC, OMS
Clincal instructor
Wound Care Education Institute
Plainfield, IL

Joy Hooper, BSN, RN, CWOCN, OMS, WCC
Owner and manager of MedicalCraft, LLC
Tifton, GA

Catherine Jackson RN, MSN, WCC
Clinical Nurse Manager
Inpatient and Outpatient Wound Care
MacNeal Hospital
Berwyn, IL

Jeffrey Jensen DPM, FACFAS
Dean & Professor of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine
Miami Shores, FL

Rosalyn S. Jordan, RN, BSN, MSc, CWOCN, WCC
Director of Clinical Education
RecoverCare, L.L.C.
Louisville, KY

Jeff Kingery
Vice President of Professional Development
RestorixHealth
Tarrytown, NY

Jeri Lundgren, RN, BSN, PHN, CWS, CWCN
Vice President of Clinical Consulting
Joerns
Charlotte, NC

Nancy Morgan, RN BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS
Co-Founder, Wound Care Education Institute
Plainfield, IL

Steve Norton, CDT, CLT-LANA
Co-founder, Lymphedema & Wound Care Education, LLC
President, Lymphedema Products, LLC
Matawan, NJ

Lu Ann Reed, RN, MSN, CRRN, RNC, LNHA, WCC
Adjunct Clinical Instructor
University of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, OH

Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, CWS, DWC
Owner
Infinitus, LLC
Chippewa Falls, WI

Cheryl Robillard,PT WCC, CLT
Clinical Specialist
Aegis Therapies
Milwaukee, WI

Stanley A Rynkiewicz III, RN, MSN, WCC, DWC, CCS
Administrator
Deer Meadows Home Health and Support Services LLC
BHP Services
Philadelphia, PA

Donald A. Wollheim, MD, WCC, DWC, FAPWCA
Owner and Clinician, IMPLEXUS Wound Care Service, LLC
Watertown, WI
Instructor for Wound Care Education Institute
Plainfield, IL

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I want free eBooks to Advance my Career.

Caring for Wounds eBook Series: Pressure Injuries

Wound Care Advisor eBooks are interactive digital tools full of insightful content, white papers and tutorials on trending topics that are assembled from the editorial staff along with supportive content provided by our marketing partners.

I want to watch free
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Convatec Skin Tears Webinar

Educate yourself on various products, valuable healthcare information, or continuing your education by exploring the archive of nursing Webinars.

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nurse beating heart american nurses association

Accurate and considered wound assessment is essential to fulfill professional nursing requirements and ensure appropriate patient and wound management.

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2016 Journal: July – August Vol. 5 No. 4

Wound Care Advisor Journal 2016

Practicing emotional intelligence may help reduce lateral violence

It’s been a stressful day at work—nothing new. One confused patient pulled off her ostomy bag, you’re having difficulties applying negative-pressure wound therapy on another, and a third patient’s family is angry with you. We all experience stressful days, but unfortunately, sometimes we take our stress out on each other. Too often, this ineffective way of identifying and managing stress leads nurses to engage in lateral violence.

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Assessing footwear in patients with diabetes

Inappropriate footwear is the most common source of trauma in patients with diabetes. Frequent and proper assessment of appropriate footwear is essential for protecting the diabetic foot from ulceration. Here is a step-by-step process for evaluating footwear. Be sure to evaluate footwear with the patient walking, standing, and sitting.

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Balancing the wheels of life

Have you ever ridden a bicycle with a wobbly wheel? The ride isn’t smooth, and you notice every bump in the road. As you focus on your discomfort, you may be distracted from the beautiful vistas you’re riding past. Think of the bicycle as your overall health, which carries you through life. For most of us, learning how to ride a bike begins in childhood as we learn…

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Clinical Notes: biofilm, bariatric surgery, statins and more

Management of biofilm recommendations The Journal of Wound Care has published “Recommendations for the management of biofilm: a consensus document,” developed through the Italian Nursing Wound Healing Society. The panel that created the document identified 10 interventions strongly recommended for clinical practice; however, panel members noted that, “there is a paucity of reliable, well-conducted clinical trials which have produced clear evidence related to the effects of biofilm presence.”

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Clinician Resources

Wound patient’s bill of rights The Association for Advancement of Wound Care has developed the “Wound Care Patient’s Bill of Rights.” The 10 points include the right to: • know what wound treatment options are available to you • know the benefits, risks, and side effects of your wound care treatments • participate in the development of your treatment plan with your wound care team • have…

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Doing it cheaply vs. doing what’s best for patients

Sad but true: Much of what we do as healthcare professionals is based on reimbursement. For nearly all the services and products we use in wound care and ostomy management, Medicare, Medicaid, and insurance companies control reimbursement. For many years, these payers have been deciding which interventions, medications, products, and equipment are the best, and then reimbursing only for those items. If we want to use something not on the list,…

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Instill instead: Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation for complex wounds

Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) uses negative pressure to draw wound edges together, remove edema and infectious material, and promote perfusion and granulation tissue development. The tissue stretch and compression created by negative pressure during NPWT promotes tissue perfusion and granulation tissue development through angiogenesis, cellular proliferation, fibroblast migration, increased production of wound healing proteins, and reduction of wound area. NPWT has been used to improve healing in a variety of wounds, including traumatic…

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Practicing emotional intelligence may help reduce lateral violence

It’s been a stressful day at work—nothing new. One confused patient pulled off her ostomy bag, you’re having difficulties applying negative-pressure wound therapy on another, and a third patient’s family is angry with you. We all experience stressful days, but unfortunately, sometimes we take our stress out on each other. Too often, this ineffective way of identifying and managing stress leads nurses to engage in lateral violence.

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Preparing the wound bed: Basic strategies, novel methods

The goal of wound-bed preparation is to create a stable, well-vascularized environment that aids healing of chronic wounds. Without proper preparation, even the most expensive wound-care products and devices are unlikely to produce positive outcomes. To best prepare the wound bed, you need to understand wound healing physiology and wound care basics, as well as how to evaluate the patient’s overall health and manage wounds that don’t respond to treatment. (See…

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Understanding NPUAP’s updates to pressure ulcer terminology and staging

On April 13, 2016, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) announced changes in pressure ulcer terminology and staging definitions. Providers can adapt NPUAP’s changes for their clinical practice and documentation, but it’s important to note that, as of press time, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has not adopted the changes. This means that providers can’t use NPUAP’s updates when completing CMS assessment forms, such as the Minimum…

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Who can perform sharp wound debridement?

Nurses and therapists often wonder if their license permits them to perform sharp wound debridement. Scope of practice varies significantly from state to state, so it’s imperative to check your state for specific guidance, but we can address some of the challenges clinicians face in deciding whether they can perform this valuable service for patients. Sharp debridement vs. other forms

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2016 Journal: July – August Vol. 5 No. 4
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Disclaimer

Wound Care Advisor is owned and published by HealthCom Media. Wound Care Advisor is peer reviewed. The views and opinions expressed in the editorial and advertising material on this website are those of the authors and advertisers and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or recommendations of the NAWCO, the Editorial Advisory Board members, or the Publisher, Editors and staff of Wound Care Advisor.

Wound Care Advisor attempts to select authorities who are knowledgeable in their fields. However, it does not warrant the expertise of any author, nor is it responsible for any statements made by any author. Certain statements about the uses, dosages, efficacy and characteristics of some drugs mentioned here reflect the opinions or investigational experience of the authors. Nurses should not use any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested by authors without evaluating the patient’s conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, reviewing any applicable manufacturer’s prescribing or usage information, and comparing these with recommendations of other authorities.

We encourage people with wounds and ostomy questions to contact their care provider; we are unable to provide medical advice.

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Submit an Article

How to submit your article

Submit your manuscript electronically as an MS Word file. Follow these guidelines:

  • At the top of the first page of the document, place the article title, your initials (not your name), and the date.
  • DO NOT include extra hard returns between lines or paragraphs, extra spaces between words, or any special coding.
  • Send a separate cover letter that includes your name; credentials; position; address; home, cell, and work telephone numbers; email address; and your employer’s name, city, and state.
  • Email the article and any other attachments to production@healthcommedia.com and csaver@healthcommedia.com.

What happens to your manuscript after submittal?

  • You will receive an email confirming receipt.
  • If your manuscript contains clinical information and we believe it has publication potential, we will send it out for blind peer review (neither you nor the reviewers will know who wrote the article). All manuscripts also receive an internal editorial review. After the review, we’ll let you know whether the manuscript has been accepted, accepted pending revisions, or declined.
  • If we accept your manuscript for publication, we’ll ask you to sign an agreement that gives HealthCom Media (publisher of Wound Care Advisor) the rights to your article so that it can be published. Each author must sign a separate agreement.
  • Your article will go through our in-house editorial process, where professional editors ensure consistency with our editorial style. You will have a chance to review the edited version before it’s published.
  • We will email you if we decide not to publish your manuscript.

Thank you for considering publishing in Wound Care Advisor, the official journal of the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy, the official. If you have any questions, please email: Cynthia Saver, RN, MS, at csaver@healthcommedia.com or csaver@clsdevelopment.com.

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Power up your patient education with analogies and metaphors

By Janice M. Beitz, PhD, RN, CS, CNOR, CWOCN, CRNP

Quality patient education is essential for comprehensive health care and will become reimbursable under healthcare reform in 2014. However, it’s difficult to provide effective education when time for patient interactions is limited. You can enhance your instruction time—and make your teaching more memorable—by using the techniques of analogy and metaphor. (more…)

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Chronic venous insufficiency with lower extremity disease: Part 2

By Donald A. Wollheim, MD, WCC, DWC, FAPWCA

To begin appropriate treatment for chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), clinicians must be able to make the correct diagnosis. Part 1 (published in the March-April edition) described CVI and its presentation. This article provides details of the CVI diagnosis (including the differential diagnosis from other diseases), disease classification to help assess the extent of CVI, diagnostic studies used to diagnose CVI, and various treatment options to “rescue” the patient from CVI. (more…)

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Chronic venous insufficiency with lower extremity disease: Part 1

By Donald A. Wollheim, MD, WCC, DWC, FAPWCA

Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is the most common cause of lower extremity wounds. The venous tree is defective, incapable of moving all the blood from the lower extremity back to the heart. This causes pooling of blood and intravascular fluid at the lowest gravitational point of the body—the ankle.

This article has two parts. Part 1 enhances your understanding of the disease and its clinical presentation. Part 2, which will appear in a later issue, explores the differential diagnosis of similar common diseases, the role that coexisting peripheral artery disease (PAD) may play, disease classification of venous insufficiency, and a general approach to therapy.

The most common form of lower extremity vascular disease, CVI affects 6 to 7 million people in the United States. Incidence increases with age and other risk factors. One study of 600 patients with CVI ulcers revealed that 50% had these ulcers for 7 to 9 months, 8% to 34% had them for more than 5 years, and 75% had recurrent ulcers.

Thrombotic complications of CVI include thrombophlebitis, which may range from superficial to extensive. If the thrombophlebitis extends up toward the common femoral vein leaving the leg, proximal ligation may be needed to prevent clot extension or embolization.

Understanding normal anatomy and physiology

Lower extremity veins flow horizontally from the superficial veins to the perforating veins and then into the deep veins. Normally, overall venous blood flows vertically against gravity from the foot and ankle upward toward the inferior vena cava (IVC). This antigravity flow toward the IVC results from muscular contraction around nonobstructed veins and one-way valves that close as blood passes them. These valves prevent abnormal backward blood flow toward the foot and ankle region.

The lower extremities have four types of veins. Superficial veins are located within the subcutaneous tissue between the dermis and muscular fascia. Examples are the greater and lesser (smaller) saphenous veins. Perforating veins connect the superficial veins to the deep veins of the leg. The deep veins are located below the muscular fascia. The communicating veins con­nect veins within the same system.

The greater saphenous vein is on the leg’s medial (inner) side. It originates from the dorsal veins on top of the foot and eventually drains into the common femoral vein in the groin region. By way of perforating veins, the greater saphenous vein drains into the deep venous system of both the calf and thigh.

The lesser saphenous vein is situated on the lateral (outer) side of the leg and originates from the lateral foot veins. As it ascends, it drains into the deep system at the popliteal vein behind the knee. Communicating veins connect the greater saphenous vein medially and the lesser saphenous vein laterally.

Intramuscular veins are the deep veins within the muscle itself, while the intermuscular veins are located between the muscle groups. The intermuscular veins are more important than other veins in development of chronic venous disease. Below the knee, the intermuscular veins are paired and take on the name of the artery they accompany—for example, paired anterior tibial, paired posterior tibial, and paired peroneal veins. Eventually, these veins form the popliteal vein behind the knee, which ultimately drains into the femoral vein of the groin.

As the common femoral vein travels below the inguinal ligament of the groin, it’s called the external iliac vein. Eventually, it becomes the common iliac vein, which drains directly into the IVC.

Pathophysiology

Abnormally elevated venous pressure stems from the leg’s inability to adequately drain blood from the leg toward the heart. Blood drainage from the leg requires the muscular pumping action of the leg onto the veins, which pump blood from the leg toward the heart as well as from the superficial veins toward the deep veins. Functioning one-way valves within the veins close when blood passes them, preventing blood from flowing backward toward the ankle. This process resembles what happens when you climb a ladder with intact rungs: As you step up from one rung to the next, you’re able to ascend.

CVI and the “broken rung” analogy

If the one-way valves are damaged or incompetent, the “broken rung” situation occurs. Think how hard it would be to climb a ladder with broken rungs: You might be able to ascend the ladder, but probably you would fall downward off the ladder due to the defective, broken rungs.

Normally, one-way valves ensure that blood flows from the lower leg toward the IVC and that the superficial venous system flows toward the deep venous system. The venous system must be patent (open) so blood flowing from the leg can flow upward toward the IVC. Blockage of a vein may result from an acute thrombosis (clot) in the superficial or deep systems. With time, blood may be rerouted around an obstructed vein. If the acute thrombosis involves one or more of the one-way valves, as the obstructing thrombosis opens up within the vein’s lumen, permanent valvular damage may occur, leading to post-thrombotic syndrome—a form of CVI.

CVI may result from an abnormality of any or all of the processes needed to drain blood from the leg—poor pumping action of the leg muscles, damage to the one-way valves, and blockage in the venous system. CVI commonly causes venous hypertension due to reversal of blood flow in the leg. Such abnormal flow may cause one or more of the following local effects:

  • leg swelling
  • tissue anoxia, inflammation, or necrosis
  • subcutaneous fibrosis
  • Compromised flow of venous blood or lymphatic fluid from the extremity.

“Water balloon” analogy

The effect of elevated venous pressure or hypertension is worst at the lowest gravitational point (around the ankle). Pooling of blood and intravascular fluid around the ankle causes a “water balloon” effect. A balloon inflated with water has a thin, easily traumatized wall. When it bursts, a large volume of fluid drains out. Due to its thicker wall, a collapsed balloon that contains less fluid is more difficult to break than one distended with water.

In a leg with CVI, subcutaneous fluid that builds up requires a weaker force to break the skin and ulcerate than does a nondistended leg with less fluid. This principle is the basis for compression therapy in treating and preventing CVI ulcers.

Effects of elevated venous pressure or hypertension

Increased pressure in the venous system causes:

  • abnormally high pressure in the superficial veins—60 to 90 mm Hg, compared to the normal pressure of 20 to 30 mm Hg
  • dilation and distortion of leg veins, because blood refluxes abnormally away from the heart and toward the lower leg and may move from the deep venous system into the superficial veins.

Abnormal vein swelling from elevated pressure in itself may impair an already abnormally functioning one-way valve. For instance, the valve may become more displaced due to the increase in intraluminal fluid, which may in turn worsen hypertension and cause an increase in leg swelling. Increased pressure from swollen veins also may dilate the capillary beds that drain into the veins; this may cause leakage of fluid and red blood cells from capillaries into the interstitial space, exacerbating leg swelling. Also, increased venous pressure may cause fibrinogen to leak from the intravascular plasma into the interstitial space. This leakage may create a fibrin cuff around the capillary bed, which may decrease the amount of oxygen entering the epidermis, increase tissue hypoxia, trigger leukocyte activation, increase capillary permeability, and cause local inflammation. These changes may lead to ulceration, lipodermatosclerosis, or both.

Visible changes may include dilated superficial veins, hemosiderin staining due to blood leakage from the venous tree, atrophie blanche, and lipodermatosclerosis. (See CVI glossary by clicking the PDF icon above.) Both atrophie blanche and lipodermatosclerosis result from local tissue scarring secondary to an inflammatory reaction of the leg distended with fluid.

Lipodermatosclerosis refers to scarring of subcutaneous tissue in severe venous insufficiency. Induration is associated with inflammation, which can cause the skin to bind to the subcutaneous tissue, causing narrowing of leg circumference. Lymphatic flow from the leg also may become compromised and inhibited in severe venous hypertension, causing additional leg swelling.

Patient history

In a patient with known or suspected CVI, a thorough history may lead to a working diagnosis. Be sure to ask the patient these questions:

  • Do you have pain?
  • Is your pain worse toward the end of the day?
  • Is the pain relieved with leg elevation at night?
  • Is it relieved with leg elevation during the day?
  • Do you have leg pain that awakens you at night?
  • How would you describe the pain?
  • Does the skin on your leg feel tight or irritated?
  • Have you noticed visible changes of your leg?
  • Do you have a leg ulcer?

Also determine if the patient has comorbidities that may exacerbate CVI, including PAD, renal failure, venous thrombosis, lymphedema, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, or malnutrition. (See CVI risk factors by clicking the PDF icon above .)

Common CVI symptoms

Approximately 20% of CVI patients have symptoms of the disease without physical findings. These symptoms may include:

  • tired, “heavy” legs that feel worse toward the end of the day
  • discomfort that worsens on standing
  • legs that feel best in the morning after sleeping or after the legs have been
  • elevated during the day.

Although patients may report leg discomfort, the history indicates that it doesn’t awaken them at night. Be aware that discomfort from CVI differs from that caused by PAD. With PAD, patients may report pain on exercise (claudication), pain with elevation (nocturnal pain), or constant pain (resting pain).

Signs of CVI (with or without ulcers) include:

  • leg swelling (seen in 25% to 75% of patients)
  • skin changes (such as hemosiderin staining or dermatitis)
  • telangiectasia, reticular veins, or both; while these are the most common signs, they represent an overall less severe finding
  • varicose veins with or without bleeding, occurring in one-third of patients with CVI.

Venous ulcers

Venous ulcers are the most common type of lower extremity ulcer. They’re commonly found on the medial aspect of the lower extremity, from the ankle to the more proximal calf area. Usually, they arise along the course of the greater saphenous vein, but also may be lateral and may occur at multiple locations. They aren’t found above the knee or on the forefoot. Venous ulcers are shallower than arterial ulcers and have considerable exudate consistent with drainage from a ruptured water balloon. They may extend completely around the leg.

CVI: From a heavy sensation to visible changes

In patients with CVI, blood flows within a lower extremity in an abnormal, reverse direction, causing build-up of blood and intravascular fluid around the ankle. Initially, this may cause only a sensation of heavy legs toward the end of the day, with no visible changes. Eventually, it may lead to venous ulcers or other visible changes. This abnormal blood flow results from dysfunction of the normal mechanisms that drain blood from the leg against gravity into the IVC.

Selected references

Alguire PC, Mathes BM. Clinical evaluation of lower extremity chronic venous disease. UpToDate. Last updated April 18, 2012. http://www.uptodate.com/contents/clinical-evaluation-of-lower-extremity-chronic-venous-disease?source=search_result&
search=Clinical+evaluation+of+lower+extremity+chronic+venous+disease&selectedTitle=1%7E150
.  Accessed March 3, 2013.

Alguire PC, Mathes BM. Diagnostic evaluation of chronic venous insufficiency. UpToDate. Last updated May 7, 2012. www.uptodate.com/contents/diagnostic-evaluation-of-chronic-venous-insufficiency?source=search_result&search=Diagnostic+evaluation
+of+chronic+venous+insufficiency&selectedTitle=1%7E127
. Accessed March 3, 2013.

Alguire PC, Mathes BM. Pathophysiology of chronic venous disease. UpToDate. Last updated April 12, 2012. www.uptodate.com/contents/pathophysiology-of-chronic-venous-disease?source=search_result&search=Pathophysiology+of+chronic+venous+disease
&selectedTitle=1%7E127
. Accessed March 3, 2013.

Alguire PC, Scovell S. Overview and management of lower extremity chronic venous disease. UpToDate. Last updated June 27, 2012. www.uptodate.com/contents/overview-and-management-of-lower-extremity-chronic-venous-disease?source=search_
result&search=Overview+and+management+of+lower+extremity+chronic+venous+disease&selectedTitle=1%7E150
. Accessed March 3, 2013.

Moneta G. Classification of lower extremity chronic venous disorders. UpToDate. Last updated October 22, 2011. www.uptodate.com/contents/classification-of-lower-extremity-chronic-venous-disorders. Accessed March 3, 2013.

Sardina D. Skin and Wound Management Course; Seminar Workbook. Wound Care Education Institute; 2011:92-112.

Donald A. Wollheim is a practicing wound care physician in southeastern Wisconsin. He also is an instructor for Wound Care Education Institute and Madison College. He serves on the Editorial Board for Wound Care Advisor.

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Author Guidelines

Wound Care Advisor, is dedicated to delivering succinct insights and information that multidisciplinary wound team members can immediately apply in their practice and use to advance their professional growth. If you’re considering writing for us, please use these guidelines to help choose an appropriate topic and learn how to prepare and submit your manuscript. Following these guidelines will increase the chance that we’ll accept your manuscript for publication

Wound Car Advisor Journal CoverAbout the journal

Wound Care Advisor serves as a practical resource for multidisciplinary skin and would care specialists. The journal provides news, clinical information, and insights from authoritative experts to enhance skin and wound care management. Wound Care Advisor is written by skin and wound care experts and presented in a reader-friendly electronic format. Clinical content is peer reviewed. It also serves as a resource for professional development and career management.

The journal is sent to Certificants of the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy and other healthcare professionals, who are also dedicated to improving skin and wound care.

Editorial profile

Each issue of Wound Care Advisor offers compelling feature articles on clinical and professional topics, plus regular departments. We publish articles that present clinical tips and techniques, discuss new or innovative treatments, provide information on technology related to wound care, review medical conditions that affect wound healing such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, address important professional and career issues, and other topics of interest to wound care specialists.

We accept submissions for these departments:

Best Practices, which includes case studies, clinical tips from wound care specialists, and other resources for clinical practice

Business Consult, which is designed to help wound care specialist manage their careers and stay current in relevant healthcare issues that affect skin and wound care.

We also welcome case studies. Please use the WCA Case Study Template as a guide

Before you submit an article…

Please send a brief email query to csaver@healthcommedia.com. In the email, state 1) the topic of your proposed article, 2) briefly describe what the article will include, 3) provide a short summary of your background, and 4) explain why you’re qualified to write on this topic. We will respond whether or not we are interested in the article you have proposed.

Tips on writing for Wound Care Advisor

Our journal is written in simple, concise language. The tone is informal, and articles are short to medium in length (about 600 words for departments and 1200 words for feature articles). When writing the manuscript, follow these guidelines:

  • Wound Care Advisor is a clinical practice journal, so keep your information practical. Give examples that readers will relate to.
  • Although our tone is informal, the content of your article must be evidence-based, including key research findings, clinical practice guidelines and relevant standards as applicable.
  • Address readers directly, as if you’re speaking to them. Here are some examples:”As a wound care specialist, you’re probably familiar with …..””After removing the dressing, measure the wound….”
  • Use active—not passive—verbs. Active verbs engage the reader and make the writing more interesting.Sentence with a passive verb: Wound edges should be assessed for undermining.Sentence with active verb (preferred): Assess the wound edges for undermining.
  • Don’t use acronyms or abbreviations, except those you’re sure every reader is familiar with (such as “I.V.”). Instead, spell out the full term.
  • When mentioning a specific drug, give the drug’s generic name first, followed by the brand name in parentheses (if relevant).
  • Consider using boxed copy (a sidebar) for points you’d like to emphasize, clarify, or elaborate on. Also consider putting appropriate information in tables (in MS Word format). DO NOT USE MS Word’s “Insert text box” feature for sidebars. Instead, label the sidebar appropriately and put it at the end of your manuscript, after the article itself.
  • Wound Care Advisor is a digital journal, a format that encourages reader interaction. If possible, please include in your manuscript at least two links to websites, videos, or other electronic resources that would be helpful to readers.
  • Do not cite references within the text. List them in alphabetical order. References must be from professionally reliable sources and should be no more than 5 years old.

For reference style, use the American Medical Association Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th ed). If you don’t have access to this book, include at least the following information for each reference you cite:

For a book: author(s), book title, edition (if appropriate), place of publication, publisher, and publication date

For a print journal article: author(s); article title; journal name; year, volume; inclusive page numbers

For online references: URL (web address) and the date you accessed the website.

About tables, photos, and illustrations

We encourage you to submit tables, photographs, and illustrations for your article (although we can’t guarantee we’ll publish them).

  • Submit them in a separate electronic file. Identify the source of each table, photo, or illustration and include a brief caption or label (e.g., “Illustration #1: Preventing complications from diabetes. From American Diabetic Association, 2006″). In the body of your article, indicate where the photo or illustration should be placed (e.g., “Insert Illustration #1 here.”) If you believe specific items in the photo or illustration should be identified, tell us this in a note. (Be aware that any person whose image is shown in a photograph must sign a consent form that gives us permission to publish it.)
  • Do not embed tables, figures, or images in the same file as the body of your article. Also, do not submit any text in a box or otherwise put rules around it, above, or below it. Instead, label this copy as a sidebar and submit it in a separate word file or at the end of the main article.
  • Authors are responsible for obtaining permission for material with a copyright. That includes figures, tables, and illustrations from other journals. It’s best to obtain permission before you submit the article and include documentation that you’ve received permission and any specific credit line that must be printed with the image. However, in cases where you must pay to use an image, note in the submission that you will obtain permission if the article is accepted for publication.

Important cautions

The article must be your own original work. Do not submit material taken verbatim from a published source.

How to submit your article

Submit your manuscript electronically as an MS Word file. Follow these guidelines:

  • At the top of the first page of the document, place the article title, your initials (not yourname), and the date.
  • DO NOT include extra hard returns between lines or paragraphs, extra spaces between words, or any special coding.
  • Send a separate cover letter that includes your name; credentials; position; address; home, cell, and work telephone numbers; email address; and your employer’s name, city, and state.
  • Email the article and any other attachments to cevansgartley@healthcommedia.com and csaver@healthcommedia.com.

What happens to your manuscript after submittal?

  • You will receive an email confirming receipt.
  • If your manuscript contains clinical information and we believe it has publication potential, we will send it out for blind peer review (neither you nor the reviewers will know who wrote the article). All manuscripts also receive an internal editorial review. After the review, we’ll let you know whether the manuscript has been accepted, accepted pending revisions, or declined.
  • If we accept your manuscript for publication, we’ll ask you to sign an agreement that gives HealthCom Media (publisher of Wound Care Advisor) the rights to your article so that it can be published. Each author must sign a separate agreement.
  • Your article will go through our in-house editorial process, where professional editors ensure consistency with our editorial style. You will have a chance to review the edited version before it’s published.
  • We will email you if we decide not to publish your manuscript.

Thank you for considering publishing in Wound Care Advisor, the official journal of the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy, the official. If you have any questions, please email: Cynthia Saver, RN, MS, at csaver@healthcommedia.com or csaver@clsdevelopment.com.

Copyright © 2017, HealthCom Media. All rights reserved.

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