You Are Here

Medicare reimbursement for hyperbaric oxygen therapy

hyperbaric oxygen therapy

By Carrie Carls, BSN, RN, CWOCN, CHRN, and Sherry Clayton, RHIA

In an atmosphere of changing reimbursement, it’s important to understand indications and utilization guidelines for healthcare services. Otherwise, facilities won’t receive appropriate reimbursement for provided services. This article focuses on Medicare reimbursement for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). (See What is hyperbaric oxygen therapy?)

Indications and documentation requirements

(more…)

Read More

Dealing with Difficult Times

> Fill out this form to receive your free Dealing with Difficult Times pdf (good to print)|

by downloading this ebook you are opting in to receiving information from WoundCareAdvisor.com.

Read More

You and the flu…

> Fill out this form to receive your free You and the flu... pdf (good to print)|

by downloading this ebook you are opting in to receiving information from WoundCareAdvisor.com.

Read More

Search Wound Care Advisor

Search
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in excerpt
Search in comments
Filter by Custom Post Type

Try these: biopadskin damageinfectionstreatment for...

The Latest on Wound Care Advisor

About WoundCareAdvisor.com

GOAL

WoundCareAdvisor.com is a unique educational web destination that has been designed to be a trusted, timely and useful resource for healthcare professionals dealing with chronic wounds and ostomy management issues.  Offerings on the side currently include 

  • News
  • Peer-reviewed articles
  • Product information
  • Provider/patient education
  • Practical resources

Information on the site is continuously developed and updated to ensure that we are providing

Resources and information that is

  • Unique to the wound care field
  • Timely
  • Informative
  • Interactive

WoundCareAdvisor.com is also going to be growing!  Future information will include:

Practice Resources

  • Clinical Notes
  • Practice Points
  • How To. . .
  • Interactive Resources
  • Forums

Bookmark this site and check back often!  Contact us at tlondon@healthcommedia.com with your comments, suggestions or if you would like to be a contributor.

Read More

Nursing OPIOID Infographic

> Fill out this form to receive your free Opioids Infographic pdf (good to print)|

by downloading this ebook you are opting in to receiving information from WoundCareAdvisor.com.

Read More

An Average Day in the Life of Nursing

Fill out this form to receive your free Day in the Life of Nursing Infographic pdf (good to print)|

by downloading this ebook you are opting in to receiving information from WoundCareAdvisor.com.

Read More

Educational Webinars

Skin Damage Associated with Moisture and Pressure

Skin Damage Associated with Moisture and PressureTips for how to differentiate and goals for protection and management. At the end of the webinar you will be able to:

  • Identify how wounds are classified according to wound depth and etiology
  • Describe the etiology of pressure injury and incontinence-associated skin damage (IAD)
  • Understand evidenced-based protocols of care for prevention and management of IAD and pressure injuries
  • Recognize and describe NPUAP-EPUAP Pressure Injury Classification System
  • Understand appropriate ConvaTec products that can be used for prevention and treatment of IAD and pressure injuries

Winning the battle of skin tears in an aging population

CFO/CNO Partnership for Workforce Management Outcomes: Benefits of Acuity-based Staffing

"Skin tears" may sound like a relatively minor event, but in reality, these injuries can have a significant impact on the quality of patients' lives in the form of pain, infection, and limited mobility.

The incidence of skin tears has been reported to be as high as 1.5 million annually, and with an aging population, this number is likely to go higher.

In this webinar, experts will explain how nurses can use an evidence-based approach -- including following practice guidelines to assess the wound and select the proper dressing -- for managing skin tears and minimizing their negative effects.

Read More

Webinars

Winning the battle of skin tears in an aging population

"Skin tears" may sound like a relatively minor event, but in reality, these injuries can have a significant impact on the quality of patients' lives in the form of pain, infection, and limited mobility.

The incidence of skin tears has been reported to be as high as 1.5 million annually, and with an aging population, this number is likely to go higher.

In this webinar, experts will explain how nurses can use an evidence-based approach -- including following practice guidelines to assess the wound and select the proper dressing -- for managing skin tears and minimizing their negative effects.

Enter your details below to get instant access to the locked content

Skin Damage Associated with Moisture and Pressure

• Identify how wounds are classified according to wound depth and etiology

• Describe the etiology of pressure injury and incontinence- associated skin damage (IAD)

• Understand evidenced-based protocols of care for prevention and management of IAD and pressure injuries

• Recognize and describe NPUAP-EPUAP Pressure Injury Classification System

• Understand appropriate ConvaTec products that can be used for prevention and treatment of IAD and pressure injuries

Enter your details below to get instant access to the locked content

Read More

eBooks

Creating an Ideal Microenvironment for Wound Cleansing

[Sponsored by Angelini Pharma, Inc.]

With so much focus on dressing choices, it’s easy to forget the importance of wound cleansing. Wound cleansing can help achieve the goals of wound bed preparation by removing microorganisms, biological and environmental debris to create an environment beneficial to healing as well as facilitating wound assessment by allowing clear visualization of the wound.

Preventing Infections in Patients with Wounds eBook

[Sponsored by Angelini Pharma, Inc.]

Proper wound care is essential to preventing infections for patients in all practice settings, and healthcare providers should stay informed about the most current and effective treatments out there.

Recognizing factors that increase patients’ susceptibility to infection allows providers to identify risks and take measures to prevent infection from occurring or worsening.

eBook: Treatment of Hard-to-Heal Wounds with Collagen-Based Dressings

[Sponsored by Angelini Pharma, Inc.]

Receive a free BioPad Sample and a free eBook with more details.

BioPad Wound Dressing with Collagen: BioPad, is a 100% equine Type-1 collagen primary wound dressing used to treat hard to heal wounds.

The BioPad collagen dressing has the highest collagen content on the market up to 5 times the amount of collagen. 

BioPad™ is the perfect dressing for wounds.

eBook: Caring for Wounds eBook Series: Pressure Injuries

[Sponsored by Angelini Pharma, Inc.]

Learn how your healthcare team can provide better patient care.

Patient care teams rely on the wound care nurse alone to implement a pressure ulcer prevention program; however, a successful program requires involvement from the entire care team and is a 24/7 endeavor.

eBook: Skin Damage Associated with Moisture and Pressure

[Sponsored by Convatec]

Tips on how to differentiate and goals for protection and management.

* Identify how wounds are classified according to wound depth and etiology.
* Describe the etiology of a pressure injury (PI) and incontinence-associated skin damage (IAD).
* Discuss evidence-based protocols of care of prevention and management if IAD and PIs.
* Describe the NPUAP-EPUAP Pressure Injury Classification System.
* Identify appropriate products that can be used for preventioin and treatment of IAD and PIs.

eBook: Needlestick Risks: Defense and Rescue Strategies for Nurses

[This e-book has been developed through an educational grant from CM&F Group]

Learn more about: 
A Continuing Risk for Healthcare Workers, Sharps Injuries: Facts and Figures, Proactive Steps for Yourself and Your Colleagues, A Preventable Injury, A Downloadable Workbook from the CDC, The Case for Coverage, If You are Exposed.

Needlesticks and other sharps-related exposures to bloodborne pathogens (including HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus) continue to pose a significant occupational risk for healthcare workers

 

Safe Biopsies eBook: Protect yourself and your patients.

[This e-book is brought to you by BiopSafe]

Safe biopsy handling
One of the most common problems in connection with biopsy handling is the risk of being exposed to formalin either through touch or inhalation. A risk that doctors, veterinarians, laboratory technicians and nurses are exposed to every day.

With BiopSafe the problem is finally solved.

receive a free BiopSafe Sample and a free eBook PDF with more information and details.

 
Read More

2016 Journal: November – December Vol. 5 No. 6

Wound Care Advisor Journal 2016 Nov/Dec Vol. 5 No. 6

Herpes zoster: Understanding the disease, its treatment, and prevention


Herpes zoster (HZ, also called shingles) is a painful condition that produces a maculopapular and vesicular rash. Usually, the rash appears along a single dermatome (band) around one side of the body or face. In most cases, pain, tingling, burning, or itching occurs a few days before the rash. Next, blisters form, scabbing over in 7 to 10 days. In…
read more

Frequently asked questions about support surfaces

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) describes support surfaces as “specialized devices for pressure redistribution designed for management of tissue loads, microclimate, and/or other therapeutic functions.” These devices include specialized mattresses, mattress overlays, chair cushions, and pads used on transport stretchers, operating room (OR) tables, examination or procedure tables, and gurneys. Some support surfaces are part of an integrated…

0 comments
Herpes zoster: Understanding the disease, its treatment, and prevention

Herpes zoster: Understanding the disease, its treatment, and prevention

Herpes zoster (HZ, also called shingles) is a painful condition that produces a maculopapular and vesicular rash. Usually, the rash appears along a single dermatome (band) around one side of the body or face. In most cases, pain, tingling, burning, or itching occurs a few days before the rash. Next, blisters form, scabbing over in 7 to 10 days. In…

0 comments

Knowing when to ask for help

As a wound care expert, you’re probably consulted for every eruption, scrape, and opening in a patient’s skin. Occasionally during a patient assessment, you may scratch your head and ask yourself, “What is this? I’ve never seen anything like it.” Most wound care experts want to help heal everyone, and most of us love a challenge. But when should we…

0 comments
Managing chronic venous leg ulcers — what’s the latest evidence?

Managing chronic venous leg ulcers — what’s the latest evidence?

Chronic venous leg ulcers (CVLUs) affect nearly 2.2 million Americans annually, including an estimated 3.6% of people over the age of 65. Given that CVLU risk increases with age, the global incidence is predicted to escalate dramatically because of the growing population of older adults. Annual CVLU treatment-related costs to the U.S. healthcare system alone are upwards of $3.5 billion,…

0 comments

Ostomy documentation tips

General characteristics Document if the diversion is an intestinal or urinary ostomy, whether it’s temporary or permanent, and the location— abdominal quadrant, skin fold, umbilicus. (See Descriptor reference.)

0 comments

Skin substitutes: Understanding product differences

Skin substitutes (also called tissuebased products and dermal replacements) are a boon to chronic wound management when traditional therapies have failed. When selecting skin substitutes for their formularies, wound care professionals have many product options—and many decisions to make. Repair of skin defects has been a pressing concern for centuries. As early as the 15th century BC, Egyptian physicians chronicled…

0 comments
2016 Journal: November – December Vol. 5 No. 6
Read More

2016 Journal: Best of the Best Vol. 5 No. 5

Wound Care Advisor Best of the Best 2016

Clinical Notes: Healing SCI Patients, antiseptics on mahout, diabetes

Electrical stimulation and pressure ulcer healing in SCI patients A systematic review of eight clinical trials of 517 patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and at least one pressure ulcer indicates that electrical stimulation increases the healing rate of pressure ulcers. Wounds with electrodes overlaying the wound bed seem to have faster pressureulcer healing than wounds with electrodes placed on intact skin around the ulcer.

read more

Case study: Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum

As a wound care specialist, you have learned about many skin conditions, some so unusual and rare that you probably thought you would never observe them. I’ve been a nurse for 38 years, with the last 10 years in wound care, and that’s certainly what I thought. But I was wrong. Let me tell you about my challenging patient with…

0 comments

Causes, prevention, and treatment of epibole

As full-thickness wounds heal, they begin to fill in from the bottom upward with granulation tissue. At the same time, wound edges contract and pull together, with movement of epithelial tissue toward the center of the wound (contraction). These epithelial cells, arising from either the wound margins or residual dermal epithelial appendages within the wound bed, begin to migrate in leapfrog or train fashion across the wound bed. Horizontal movement stops when…

0 comments
Electrical stimulation

Clinical Notes: Healing SCI Patients, antiseptics on mahout, diabetes

Electrical stimulation and pressure ulcer healing in SCI patients A systematic review of eight clinical trials of 517 patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and at least one pressure ulcer indicates that electrical stimulation increases the healing rate of pressure ulcers. Wounds with electrodes overlaying the wound bed seem to have faster pressureulcer healing than wounds with electrodes placed on intact skin around the ulcer.

0 comments

Clinician Resources: Pressure-Injuries, Ostomy, Lymphedema, Delirium

Here is a round-up of resources that you may find helpful in your practice. New illustrations for pressure-injury staging The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has released new illustrations of pressure injury stages. You can download the illustrations, which include normal Caucasian and non-Caucasian skin illustrations for reference. There is no charge for the illustrations as long as they are being used for educational purposes, but donations to…

0 comments

Cutaneous candidiasis

By Nancy Morgan, RN, BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS Each issue, Apple Bites brings you a tool you can apply in your daily practice. Here’s an overview of cutaneous candi­diasis. Cutaneous candidiasis is an infection of the skin caused by the yeast Candida albicans or other Candida species. Here’s a snapshot of this condition.

0 comments

How to apply silver nitrate

Topical application of silver nitrate is often used in wound care to help remove and debride hypergranulation tissue or calloused rolled edges in wounds or ulcerations. It’s also an effective agent to cauterize bleeding in wounds. Silver nitrate is a highly caustic material, so it must be used with caution to prevent damage to healthy tissues.

0 comments

How to manage peristomal skin problems

For an ostomy pouching system to adhere properly, the skin around the stoma must be dry and intact. Otherwise, peristomal skin problems and skin breakdown around the stoma may occur. In fact, these problems are the most common complications of surgical stomas. They can worsen the patient’s pain and discomfort, diminish quality of life, delay rehabilitation, increase use of ostomy supplies, and raise healthcare costs. Peristomal skin problems also perpetuate a…

0 comments

Immobility as the root cause of pressure ulcers

By Jeri Lundgren, BSN, RN, PHN, CWS, CWCN Many factors can contribute to the formation of a pressure ulcer, but it’s rare that one develops in an active, mobile patient. As the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel 2014 guidelines state, “Pressure ulcers cannot form without loading, or pressure on the tissue. Extended periods of lying or sitting on a particular…

0 comments

No more skin tears

Imagine watching your skin tear, bleed, and turn purple. Imagine, too, the pain and disfigurement you’d feel. What if you had to live through this experience repeatedly? That’s what many elderly people go through, suffering with skin tears through no fault of their own. Some go on to develop complications. A skin tear is a traumatic wound caused by shear, friction, or blunt-force trauma that results in a partial-…

0 comments

Our gold medal issue: Best of the Best 2016

This issue marks the fourth anniversary of the “Best of the Best” issue of Wound Care Advisor, the official journal of the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy. Fittingly, it comes during an Olympics year. Since 1904, the Olympics have awarded gold medals to athletes whose performance makes them the “best of the best.” This year, we’re proud to present our own “Best…

0 comments

Preventing pressure ulcers in pediatric patients

By Roxana Reyna, BSN, RNC-NIC, WCC, CWOCN As wound care clinicians, we are trained—and expected—to help heal wounds in patients of any age and to achieve positive outcomes. Basic wound-healing principles apply to all patients, whatever their age or size. The specific anatomy and physiology of vulnerable pediatric patients, however, requires detailed wound care. Unfortunately, little evidence-based research exists to…

0 comments
Pros Cons Hydrocolloid Foot Ulcers

Pros and cons of hydrocolloid dressings for diabetic foot ulcers

Diabetic foot ulcers stem from multiple factors, including peripheral neuropathy, high plantar pressures, decreased vascularity, and impaired wound healing. Contributing significantly to morbidity, they may cause limb loss and death. (See Foot ulcers and diabetes.) Initially, hydrocolloid dressings were developed to function as part of the stomal flange. Based on their success in protecting peristomal skin, they were introduced gradually…

0 comments
2016 Journal: Best of the Best Vol. 5 No. 5
Read More
1 2 3
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!

Wound Care is Important. Please spread the word :)

RSS5k
Follow by Email102k
Facebook4k
Facebook